Hyperloop
Hyperloop
photosource: Hyperloop One

Elon Tusk is mostly known for his Tesla cars. But that’s not everything about this ambition person from United States of America. Oh no! He is also here to revolutionize the way we travel between places on earth. And that thing is called Hyperloop. People will be transported in speeds beyond 1000 km/h between cities underground is his goals which seems to be reached soon. Now, the latest test records have managed to reach 308 km/h, which is 192 mph! This was done on 29th of July this year!

Hyperloop
photosource: Hyperloop One

Two Weeks ago Hyperloop managed to reach 113 km/h

From 113 km/h to 308 km/h there is a quite a jump. However, if Elon Tusk wants to reach speeds to over 1000 km/h ambition then there is some more tests and tweaks that needs to be done for sure. His goal is to reach 1126,54 km/h!!! With no air inside the cylinder tube-tunnel, the pressure inside int is around 60 000 meters above the ocean the company explains in the article on The Verge.

Here in Norway, the fastest train is the airport shuttle train going at 210 km/h. So, with this latest test. Now, that’s much faster. However, it will take some time to reach the Japanese magnetic train top speed at 603 km/h, but as the Hyperloop is still in testing stage a much greater speed is to be expected in the near future.

More Environmentally Friendly travel than Flying

There are some countries like Japan, France and Germany that have put all environmentally forces to create high-speed train lines connecting their cities. Sweden also have some sort of that service also, while the rest of the world wonders if train or bus is still the thing. It’s pretty silly, when all of these 3 countries shows how much more enviromently friendly it is to take the train than taking flights in the same directions. In some areas of Europe the trains have even managed to win over the short flight routes.

So, go on and tell your leaders that trains or even Hyperloop is something to look onto!

Hyperloop One Video

Source
The Verge